Reference
Reference
Study Type
Study Type
Patients/Events
Patients/Events
Study Objective(Purpose of Study)
Study Objective(Purpose of Study)
Study Results
Study Results
Study Quality
Study Quality
1. Nassiri N, Cirillo-Penn NC, Thomas J. Evaluation and management of congenital peripheral arteriovenous malformations. J Vasc Surg. 62(6):1667-76, 2015 Dec. Review/Other-Dx N/A To discuss fundamental principles that have been established as our understanding of the pathogenesis, natural history, hemodynamics, and treatment outcomes has expanded and evolved over the last few decades. No results stated in abstract. 4
2. Kramer U, Ernemann U, Fenchel M, et al. Pretreatment evaluation of peripheral vascular malformations using low-dose contrast-enhanced time-resolved 3D MR angiography: initial results in 22 patients. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 196(3):702-11, 2011 Mar. Observational-Dx 22 patients To assess the feasibility and diagnostic performance of time-resolved MR angiography (MRA) in the pretreatment evaluation of peripheral vascular malformations at 1.5 T. On the basis of time-resolved MRA, nine of the lesions were categorized as high-flow arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), the remaining 13 lesions were categorized as low-flow vascular malformations or hemangiomas. There was no significant difference in the image quality grading scores between the two observers for time-resolved MRA (p = 0.61) and conventional MRA (p = 0.54). The kappa coefficient revealed good agreement (kappa = 0.76) between time-resolved MRA and conventional MRA. Both observers visualized fine vascular details with higher confidence in two patients on conventional MRA. The additional functional information regarding feeding artery and flow patterns provided by time-resolved MRA was confirmed by digital subtraction in all nine cases. 1
3. McCafferty I.. Management of Low-Flow Vascular Malformations: Clinical Presentation, Classification, Patient Selection, Imaging and Treatment. [Review]. Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol. 38(5):1082-104, 2015 Oct. Review/Other-Dx N/A To give an overview of the current state of imaging, patient selection, agents and techniques used in the management of low-flow vascular malformations. No results stated in abstract. 4
4. Ek ET, Suh N, Carlson MG. Vascular anomalies of the hand and wrist. [Review]. J Am Acad Orthop Surg. 22(6):352-60, 2014 Jun. Review/Other-Tx N/A To discuss the complications of vascular malformations of the hand and wrist. No results stated in abstract. 4
5. Jacobs BJ, Anzarut A, Guerra S, Gordillo G, Imbriglia JE. Vascular anomalies of the upper extremity. [Review][Erratum appears in J Hand Surg Am. 2011 Jan;36(1):183 Note: Guerra, Sara [added]; Gordillo, Gayle [added]]. J Hand Surg [Am]. 35(10):1703-9; quiz 1709, 2010 Oct. Review/Other-Dx N/A To discuss proper diagnosis for the treatment of patients with hemangiomas and vascular malformations, which are separate entities and require different treatment strategies. No results stated in abstract. 4
6. Madani H, Farrant J, Chhaya N, et al. Peripheral limb vascular malformations: an update of appropriate imaging and treatment options of a challenging condition. [Review]. Br J Radiol. 88(1047):20140406, 2015 Mar. Review/Other-Dx N/A To discuss the wide spectrum of peripheral vascular malformations that can present as incidental findings or produce potentially life- or limb-threatening complications. No results stated in abstract. 4
7. El-Merhi F, Garg D, Cura M, Ghaith O. Peripheral vascular tumors and vascular malformations: imaging (magnetic resonance imaging and conventional angiography), pathologic correlation and treatment options. [Review]. Int J Cardiovasc Imaging. 29(2):379-93, 2013 Feb. Review/Other-Dx N/A To review recent development in imaging techniques of various vascular anomalies most of which are affecting the peripheral system which potentially may broaden understanding of their diagnosis, classification and treatment. No results stated in abstract. 4
8. Moukaddam H, Pollak J, Haims AH. MRI characteristics and classification of peripheral vascular malformations and tumors. [Review] [59 refs]. Skeletal Radiol. 38(6):535-47, 2009 Jun. Review/Other-Dx N/A To discuss magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the classification of vascular malformations, tumors, and the broad spectrum of associated lesions that can cause significant morbidity and even mortality in children and adults. No results stated in abstract. 4
9. Mostardi PM, Young PM, McKusick MA, Riederer SJ. High temporal and spatial resolution imaging of peripheral vascular malformations. J Magn Reson Imaging. 36(4):933-42, 2012 Oct. Observational-Dx 12 patients To assess the performance of a recently developed 3D time-resolved CE-MRA technique, Cartesian Acquisition with Projection-Reconstruction-like sampling (CAPR), for accurate characterization and treatment planning of vascular malformations of the periphery. Time-resolved CE-MRA allowed for characterization of malformation flow and type. Feeding and draining vessels were identified in all cases. Overall quality for diagnosis and treatment planning was 3.58/4.0, and correlation with conventional angiography was scored as 3.89/4.0. 3
10. Dave RB, Fleischmann D. Computed Tomography Angiography of the Upper Extremities. [Review]. Radiol Clin North Am. 54(1):101-14, 2016 Jan. Review/Other-Dx N/A To discuss upper extremity computed tomography angiography in the evaluation of acute and nonacute arterial pathology. Volume-rendered, maximum intensity projection, and multiplanar reformat images are indispensable for evaluating the data set. 4
11. American College of Radiology. ACR–NASCI–SIR–SPR Practice Parameter for the Performance and Interpretation of Body Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA). Available at: https://www.acr.org/-/media/ACR/Files/Practice-Parameters/body-cta.pdf Review/Other-Dx N/A Guidance document to promote the safe and effective use of diagnostic and therapeutic radiology by describing specific training, skills and techniques. No abstract available. 4
12. Walker EA, Salesky JS, Fenton ME, Murphey MD. Magnetic resonance imaging of malignant soft tissue neoplasms in the adult. [Review]. Radiol Clin North Am. 49(6):1219-34, vi, 2011 Nov. Review/Other-Dx N/A To address the spectrum of malignant soft tissue tumors frequently found in adults. No results stated in abstract. 4
13. Carra BJ, Bui-Mansfield LT, O'Brien SD, Chen DC. Sonography of musculoskeletal soft-tissue masses: techniques, pearls, and pitfalls. [Review]. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 202(6):1281-90, 2014 Jun. Review/Other-Dx N/A To review the appropriate use of ultrasound in the workup of soft-tissue masses of the extremities. No results stated in abstract. 4
14. Paltiel HJ, Burrows PE, Kozakewich HP, Zurakowski D, Mulliken JB. Soft-tissue vascular anomalies: utility of US for diagnosis. Radiology. 214(3):747-54, 2000 Mar. Review/Other-Dx 87 vascular anomalies To determine the ultrasonographic (US) features that distinguish soft-tissue hemangioma from vascular malformation and one type of malformation from another. There were 49 hemangiomas and 38 vascular malformations. A significantly greater proportion of hemangiomas (48 of 49) compared with vascular malformations (zero of 38) consisted of a solid-tissue mass (P < .001). Vessel density was comparable for hemangioma and arteriovenous malformation (AVM) but significantly greater compared with the other vascular malformations (P < .001 in each case). No differences in mean arterial peak velocity were detected between hemangiomas and malformations. Mean venous peak velocity was significantly higher for AVM than for other vascular malformations and hemangioma. Mean resistive index was greater for lymphatic malformation than for hemangioma or AVM. Abnormal veins, arteries and veins, or cysts were univariate predictors for distinguishing between venous, arteriovenous, and lymphatic malformations (P < .001 in all cases). Solid-tissue mass was the only multivariate predictor for differentiating hemangioma from vascular malformation (likelihood ratio test = 109.8, P < .001). 4
15. Lee JY, Kim SM, Fessell DP, Jacobson JA. Sonography of benign palpable masses of the elbow. [Review]. J Ultrasound Med. 30(8):1113-9, 2011 Aug. Review/Other-Dx N/A To show the sonographic appearances of benign masses found in and around the elbow, including fat-containing tumors, fibrous tumors, vascular lesions, selected skin lesions, and other miscellaneous lesions. Sonographic features, including the use of dynamic and color Doppler imaging, can be helpful in characterizing these masses and in narrowing the differential diagnosis. No results stated in abstract. 4
16. Oe Y, Orr L, Laifer-Narin S, et al. Contrast-enhanced sonography as a novel tool for assessment of vascular malformations. J Angiogenes Res. 2:25, 2010 Nov 22. Review/Other-Dx 1 female Not stated in abstract. Not stated in abstract. 4
17. Wiesinger I, Jung W, Zausig N, et al. Evaluation of dynamic effects of therapy-induced changes in microcirculation after percutaneous treatment of vascular malformations using contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and time intensity curve (TIC) analyses. Clin Hemorheol Microcirc. 69(1-2):45-57, 2018. Observational-Dx 197 patients To demonstrate the effect of percutaneous interventional treatment on local microcirculation of peripheral vascular malformations using contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and time intensity curve (TIC) analysis. After the treatment there was a significant decrease for median area under the curve (AUC) in vascular malformations (VM) in the center from 297.8 (14.5–2167.6) rU down to 243.3 (0.1–1678.8) rU (p = 0.043) and in the surrounding tissue down to 107.7 (20.2–660.2) rU (p = 0.018). For the other malformations AUC decreased in the center and the margins as well. Time to peak (TTP) rose, however these changes did not reach the level of significance. 3
18. Cook TS.. Computed Tomography Angiography of the Lower Extremities. [Review]. Radiol Clin North Am. 54(1):115-30, 2016 Jan. Review/Other-Dx N/A To discuss CT angiography (CTA) of the lower extremities as an important and versatile, noninvasive tool for diagnosis as well as surgical or endovascular interventional planning. No results stated in abstract. 4
19. Oca Pernas R, Prada Gonzalez R, Santos Armentia E, et al. Benign soft-tissue lesions of the fingers: radiopathological correlation and clinical considerations. [Review]. Skeletal Radiol. 44(4):477-90, 2015 Apr. Review/Other-Dx N/A To discuss soft-tissue lesions of the fingers, which are commonly found in daily clinical practice and represent a wide range of tumors and pseudotumors, are mostly benign. Radiologists should be familiar with imaging findings so that they can determine the size, extension, and affected neighboring anatomical structures, and provide information that allows adequate presurgical counseling. 4
20. Walker EA, Fenton ME, Salesky JS, Murphey MD. Magnetic resonance imaging of benign soft tissue neoplasms in adults. [Review]. Radiol Clin North Am. 49(6):1197-217, vi, 2011 Nov. Review/Other-Dx N/A To review a spectrum of benign soft tissue tumors found in adults. No results stated in abstract. 4
21. Hadizadeh DR, Marx C, Gieseke J, Schild HH, Willinek WA. High temporal and high spatial resolution MR angiography (4D-MRA). [Review]. ROFO Fortschr Geb Rontgenstr Nuklearmed. 186(9):847-59, 2014 Sep. Review/Other-Dx N/A To provide an overview of the development of TR-MRA methods and the 4D-MRA techniques as they are currently used in the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of vascular diseases in various parts of the body. No results stated in abstract. 4
22. Ergun T, Lakadamyali H, Derincek A, Tarhan NC, Ozturk A. Magnetic resonance imaging in the visualization of benign tumors and tumor-like lesions of hand and wrist. [Review] [49 refs]. Curr Probl Diagn Radiol. 39(1):1-16, 2010 Jan-Feb. Review/Other-Dx N/A To offer a practical radiological approach to benign tumors and tumor-like lesions of the hand and wrist region based on most frequently observed MRI findings. No results stated in abstract. 4
23. Jewell DJ.. Case studies in the diagnosis of upper extremity pain using magnetic resonance imaging. J Hand Ther. 20(2):132-47, 2007 Apr-Jun. Review/Other-Dx N/A To demonstrate that only a small number of the possible causes of upper extremity pain can be diagnosed with MR imaging. No results stated in abstract. 4
24. van Rijswijk CS, van der Linden E, van der Woude HJ, van Baalen JM, Bloem JL. Value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging in diagnosing and classifying peripheral vascular malformations. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 178(5):1181-7, 2002 May. Observational-Dx 27 patients. To evaluate prospectively whether MR imaging, including dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, could be used to categorize peripheral vascular malformations and especially to identify venous malformations that do not need angiography for treatment. Excellent agreement between the two observers in determining MR categories (gamma = 0.99) existed. Agreement between MR categories and angiographic categories was high for both observers (gamma = 0.97 and 0.92). Sensitivity of conventional MR imaging in differentiating venous and nonvenous malformations was 100%, whereas specificity was 24-33%. Specificity increased to 95% by adding dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, but sensitivity decreased to 83%. 1
25. Razek AA, Saad E, Soliman N, Elatta HA. Assessment of vascular disorders of the upper extremity with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography: pictorial review. [Review] [15 refs]. Jpn J Radiol. 28(2):87-94, 2010 Feb. Review/Other-Dx N/A To review the role of contrast magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in patients with vascular disorders of the upper extremity. No results stated in abstract. 4
26. American College of Radiology. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Radiation Dose Assessment Introduction. Available at: https://www.acr.org/-/media/ACR/Files/Appropriateness-Criteria/RadiationDoseAssessmentIntro.pdf. Review/Other-Dx N/A To provide evidence-based guidelines on exposure of patients to ionizing radiation. No abstract available. 4